Tamarind Mem

Tamarind Mem Kamini has recently moved from India to Canada Plunged into the past by acrimonious telephone calls and odd postcards from her mother she tries to make sense of the eccentric family she has left behi

  • Title: Tamarind Mem
  • Author: Anita Rau Badami
  • ISBN: 9780141002491
  • Page: 260
  • Format: None
  • Tamarind Mem Quill and Quire Tamarind Mem is a delectable book, filled with pungent sights and sounds and poignant memories It proves, yet again, that each person in a family experiences that microcosm differently It proves, yet again, that each person in a family experiences that microcosm differently. Tamarind Mem Anita Rau Badami, Malika Mendez A wise and affectionate portrait of two generations in an East Indian family, Tamarind Mem is a beautifully evocative novel that explores the mutability of memory and unravels the deep ties of love and resentment that bind mothers and daughters everywhere. Tamarind Woman by Anita Rau Badami Jan , Tamarind Mem is a story about a daughter, Kamini, who desires to know her perplexing mother, Saroja, and her secret life which Kamini caught glimpses of as a child The story begins with Kamini s portrait of her mother painted with recollections from her childhood, interspersed with glimpses from the present as Saroja takes a train ride around India as a sort of pilgrimage, and send vague Tamarind Mem penguinrandomhouse Feb , About Tamarind Mem A beautiful and brilliant portrait of two generations of women Set in India s railway colonies, this is the story of Kamini and her mother Saroja, nicknamed Tamarind Mem due to her sour tongue. Tamarind Mem by Anita Rau Badami Fantastic Fiction Tamarind Mem by Anita Rau Badami book cover, description, publication history. Tamarind Mem by Anita Rau Badami OverDrive Rakuten A beautiful and brilliant portrait of two generations of women Set in India s railway colonies, this is the story of Kamini and her mother Saroja, nicknamed Tamarind Mem due to her sour tongue While in Canada beginning her graduate studies, Kamini receives a postcard from her mother saying she has sold their home and is travelling through India. Tamarind Mem, Book by Anita Rau Badami Paperback Mar , Set in India s railway colonies, this is the story of Kamini and her mother Saroja, nicknamed Tamarind Mem due to her sour tongue While in Canada beginning her graduate studies, Kamini receives a postcard from her mother saying she has sold their home and is Tamarind Mem Book Club Kit Vancouver Public Library We are presented with two narrations in this book first the young daughter who has moved to Calgary from India, and then her mother who is now a widow who is travelling throughout India to see the sites that her husband never took her as a railroad employee. Free Essays on Tamarind Mem Brainia Free Essays on Tamarind Mem Search Mems forces and surface science dominate.Welcome to the MICRO DOMAIN, a world now occupied by an explosive new technology known as MEMS Micro Electro Mechanical Systems MEMS is the next logical step in the silicon revolution The silicon revolution began over three decades ago, with the introduction Tamarind Woman by by Anita Rau Badami Summary and reviews Set in India s railway colonies, Tamarind Woman tells the story of two generations of women Kamini, an overachiever, has moved to Canada to begin her graduate studies Her mother, Saroja, nicknamed Tamarind Woman due to her sour tongue, is bitter because of her loveless marriage and her thwarted ambition to become a doctor. Book Review Tamarind Mem HuffPost UK Tamarind Mem, a Canadian bestseller novel from , written by Indian born is an infectious and unforgettable story of an extensively engaged childhood, family, identity, culture and its inherent Best Review Tamarind Mem By Anita Rau Badami Paperback Tamarind Mem by Anita Rau Badami Paperback Discount Overall the buyers and users of this product agree that Tamarind Mem by Anita Rau Badami Paperback Review gives the right value due to its selling price It s a great Tamarind Mem by Anita Rau Badami Paperback and we absolutely recommend it Here is The Best Tamarind Mem by Anita Rau Badami Paperback and Fast to Badami, Anita Rau Postcolonial Studies ScholarBlogs Tamarind Mem As the vehicle for explaining the two women s different perceptions of the same past, Badami reflects on the shakiness of memory and the elusive nature of mind She connects this theme with the mother and daughter s relationship and their contrary recollections of the past Kozminuk. Tamarind Mem Kindle Edition A vivid portrait of two Indian women of different generations, Tamarind Mem explores the mutability of memory and the deep ties of love and resentment between mothers and daughters. Anita Rau Badami Anita Rau Badami born September is a writer of South Asian descent living in Canada Born in Rourkela, Odisha, India, she was educated at the University of Madras and Sophia Polytechnic in Bombay She emigrated to Canada in , and earned an M.A at the University of Calgary Her first novel was Tamarind Mem . Download Tamarind Mem Audiobook by Anita Rau Badami Set in India s railway colonies, this is the story of Kamini and her mother Saroja, nicknamed Tamarind Mem due to her sour tongue While in Canada beginning her graduate studies, Kamini receives a postcard from her mother saying she has sold their home and is travelling through India. Tamarind Mem Kathryn Kate MacDonald Tamarind Mem published in the U.S as Tamarind Woman is the first of four novels by Anita Rau Badami The novel languished on my bedside table for a very long time, always being resorted to the bottom of an ever changing pile of books Then, I picked it up and didn t put it down until immersion into a life I can barely imagine was sated. Tamarind Mem Canadian Edition by Anita Rau Badami Set in India s railway colonies, this is the story of Kamini and her mother Saroja, nicknamed Tamarind Mem due to her sour tongue While in Canada beginning her graduate studies, Kamini receives a postcard from her mother saying she has sold their home and is travelling through India. Tamarind Mem Anita Rau Badami Books Mar , Review Ottawa Citizen An engaging depiction of a daughter s longing to know her mother and of our tendency to see things the way we want rather than the way they are Calgary Herald Tamarind Mem s strength is in its depiction of family tensions, the elusiveness of memories and how dreams and disappointments are passed from one generation Tamarind Mem by Badami, Anita Rau for sale online Tamarind Mem by Badami, Anita Rau An apparently unread copy in perfect condition Dust cover is intact pages are clean and are not marred by notes or folds of any kind At ThriftBooks, our motto is Read More, Spend Less. TRANSCEND MEDIA SERVICE Tamarind Mem Tamarind Mem REVIEWS, Feb Sumeet Grover TRANSCEND Media Service Tamarind Mem, a Canadian bestseller novel from , written by Indian born Anita Rau Badami is an infectious and unforgettable story of an extensively engaged childhood, family, identity, culture and its inherent oppression of women, narrated through genius storytelling. Tamarind Mem A Novel by Badami, Anita Rau for sale online Find many great new used options and get the best deals for Tamarind Mem A Novel by Badami, Anita Rau at the best online prices at eBay Free shipping for many products Tamarind Tamarind Tamarindus indica is a leguminous tree family Fabaceae bearing edible fruit that is indigenous to tropical Africa The genus Tamarindus is monotypic, meaning that it contains only this species The tamarind tree produces pod like fruit that contains a brown, edible pulp used in cuisines around the world. Tamarind Mem by Anita Rau Badami LibraryThing Tamarind Mem is a mother daughter story told alternately by Kamini, Soraja s daughter, in the first half of the novel and by Soraja in the second half Kamini was born in India just before independence, but is living in Calgary as she tells her story having left India many years earlier. Tamarind Mem by Anita Rau Badami AbeBooks Tamarind Mem by ANITA RAU BADAMI and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at AbeBooks. Tamarindo Memo Paris for women and men Fragrantica Tamarindo by Memo Paris is a Oriental Spicy fragrance for women and men This is a new fragrance Tamarindo was launched in The nose behind this fragrance is Sophie Labbe.Top notes are bergamot, cardamom, orange and mandarin orange middle notes are pineapple, jasmine, coconut, peach, tuberose and ylang ylang base notes are benzoin, patchouli and vanilla. Tamarind Mem Anita Rau Badami Anita Rau Badami is the author of two critically acclaimed, bestselling novels, Tamarind Mem and The Hero s Walk Both have been published in several countries In , Anita won the Marian Engel Award for excellence in fiction for a body of work. Tamarind Mem Anita Rau Badami, Malika Mendez I read Tamarind Mem through the Tagore s lens which I had just acquired, but I also read it simply as a woman There are, first of all, the issues connected to arranged marriages The central character, the Tamarind Mem, is a young woman who is married off to a complete stranger in spite of her vocal protestations and desire for advanced Book Review Tamarind Mem by Anita Rau Badami In My Tamarind Mem, written by nationally acclaimed writer Anita Rau Badami, is a tale of a mother and a daughter and their respective life stories The Tamarind Mem, written by nationally acclaimed writer Anita Rau Badami, is a tale of a mother and a daughter and their respective life stories The. Tamarind Mem ebook by Anita Rau Badami Rakuten Kobo Read Tamarind Mem by Anita Rau Badami available from Rakuten Kobo Sign up today and get off your first purchase A beautiful and brilliant portrait of two generations of women Set in India s railway colonies, this is the story of Ka Tamarind Mem, Book by Anita Rau Badami Audio Book A wise and affectionate portrait of two generations in an East Indian family, Tamarind Mem is a beautifully evocative novel that explores the mutability of memory and unravels the deep ties of love and resentment that bind mothers and daughters everywhere. Tamarind mem Book, WorldCat Get this from a library Tamarind mem Anita Rau Badami Set in India s railway colonies, Tamarind Woman tells the story of two generations of women Kamini, an overachiever, has moved to Canada to begin her graduate studies Her mother, Saroja, nicknamed Untitled Prezi by vishal manjania on Prezi Tamarind MEM The story Tamarind MEM written by Anita Rau Badami, has two parts to it One part is from the mother s perspective and the other from the daughter s perspective The setting of this story takes place in the railway colonies of India This is the story of Kamini and Tamarind Mem Portrait of Indian Women in Two Generations Jan , The central character, the Tamarind Mem, is a young woman who is married off to a complete stranger in spite of her vocal protestations and desire for advanced education and independence She has always had a sharp tongue, something that seems common to many Indian women in stories. Tamarind mem Book, WorldCat Note Citations are based on reference standards However, formatting rules can vary widely between applications and fields of interest or study The specific requirements or preferences of your reviewing publisher, classroom teacher, institution or organization should be applied. Tamarind Mem Book Hamilton Public Library BiblioCommons Tamarind Mem Book Badami, Anita Rau Westdale Branch will be closing for approximately weeks for renovations beginning Saturday, April , at p.m. Tamarind Mem Audiobook Anita Rau Badami Audible Set in India s railway colonies, this is the story of Kamini and her mother, Saroja, nicknamed Tamarind Mem due to her sour tongue While in Canada beginning her graduate studies, Kamini receives a postcard from her mother saying she has sold their home and is traveling through India. Of Mothers and Daughters Tamarind Mem by Anita Rau Sep , Tamarind Mem published in the U.S as Tamarind Woman is the first of four novels by Anita Rau Badami The novel languished on my bedside table for a very long time, always being resorted to the bottom of an ever changing pile of books. MENU Tamarind Restaurant I ve visited the Tamarind on loads of occasions and have never had a bad meal, the waiters are always attentive and the dishes are tasty and well sized Offers on during the week represent excellent value for money, not only that, but they ve got a World Record as well Past Cultural Restrictions In Anita Rau Badami s Can You Oct , Read Past Cultural Restrictions In Anita Rau Badami s Can You Hear The Night Bird Call And Tamarind Mem , Journal on English Language Teaching on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips. Anita Rau Badami Canadian author Britannica Other articles where Anita Rau Badami is discussed Canadian literature Fiction among the Parsi community, while Anita Rau Badami s novels Tamarind Mem and The Hero s Walk portray the cross cultural effect on Indian families in India and Canada. Editions of Tamarind Woman by Anita Rau Badami Editions for Tamarind Woman Paperback published in , ebook published in , , Hardcover publish Tamarind Mem BiblioCommons Tamarind Mem Book Badami, Anita Rau A beautiful and brilliant portrait of two generations of women Set in India s railway colonies, this is the story of Kamini and her mother Saroja, nicknamed Tamarind Mem due to her sour tongue While in Canada beginning her graduate studies, Kamini receives a postcard from her mother saying she has sold their home and is travelling through India. Tamarind Woman book review Book reviews Curled Up Tamarind Woman was first published in worldwide except in the US as Tamarind Mem as in memsahib, an Anglo Indian word for Mam Published in the US in the spring of , it followed by a year the US publication of Badami s second novel, The Hero s Walk Badami is a major voice in Indian literacy s chorus and a force in Canadian Tamarind Mem Anita Rau Badami Tamarind mem Anita Rau Badami Snippet view rupees sahib sari servants Shabnam shikakai silence sister skin slap sleep smell smile snapped Sometimes staring stay stop stories sure talk tamarind tell things thought tiny told tongue train tree turn verandah voice waiting watch whispered wife window woman words worry What Is Tamarind Paste and How Is It Used Tamarind paste is from the fruit or pods of the tamarind tree, specifically the pulp that surrounds the seeds within the pod The tamarind tree is a common fruit tree that is native to Africa but now grows all over Asia and also in Mexico it bears large brown pods that contain the tamarind fruit. PAST CULTURAL RESTRICTIONS IN ANITA RAU BADAMI S PAST CULTURAL RESTRICTIONS IN ANITA RAU BADAMI S CAN YOU HEAR THE NIGHT BIRD CALL AND TAMARIND MEM INTRODUCTION Indian writing in Holdings Tamarind mem York University Libraries Author to critic the letters of Mulk Raj Anand edited, with an introduction, and notes by Saros Cowasjee.

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    Kamini has recently moved from India to Canada Plunged into the past by acrimonious telephone calls and odd postcards from her mother, she tries to make sense of the eccentric family she has left behind Why was her Mother as bitter as a tamarind with her lot in life Why did she seem to love Roopa best, rubbing almond oil on her skin at bath time and never scolding her fKamini has recently moved from India to Canada Plunged into the past by acrimonious telephone calls and odd postcards from her mother, she tries to make sense of the eccentric family she has left behind Why was her Mother as bitter as a tamarind with her lot in life Why did she seem to love Roopa best, rubbing almond oil on her skin at bath time and never scolding her for getting her sums wrong And where did she disappear to while Dadda was away on business, leaving her daughters in the care of a superstitious old ayah A wise and affectionate portrait of two generations of women in an Indian family, Tamarind Woman is a beautifully evocative novel that explores the mutability of memory and unravels the deep ties of love and resentment that bind mothers and daughters everywhere.Tamarind Woman is the author s debut novel.

    Comment 593

    • Saleh MoonWalker says:

      Onvan : Tamarind Woman - Nevisande : Anita Rau Badami - ISBN : 747560218 - ISBN13 : 9780747560210 - Dar 272 Safhe - Saal e Chap : 1997

    • Sarah says:

      I picked up this book because I wanted a rich way of exploring parent-child relationships in a South Asian context. It’s well-written, I guess, and not without some worthwhile reflections. But you have to dig very, very deep, past a lot of ugliness in traditional Indian culture, to find them. And I couldn’t be arsed to do so.So to me, the book is needlessly depressing and contains no positive messages. It’s more along the lines of: “Hey, life may suck and be loveless and suffocating for [...]

    • Sarah says:

      I really enjoyed the story about family life on the Indian railway, but I had a few issues with the story. It took me a while to realize that the novel was chronological with breaks for the narrator's present interactions with other characters. I also missed the chapters, but that was for my own personal convenience to know when to take a break. Badami offers two sections - one narrated from Kamani's perspective and another from Saroja. I wish she also offered one from Roopa. I would have liked [...]

    • Amy says:

      I really enjoyed the narrative thread of this novel. I liked reading from the daughter's perspective (Kamini) and then from the mother's (Saroya). It reminded that though you think you know someone and how they feel, in reality, we only know pieces of that person and their story. You have to listen with your heart and to want to know the story in order to really hear it. I learned this from this book--and I was engaged in the story and the characters throughout. None of them were wholly one thin [...]

    • Bonnie says:

      I had high hopes for this book as I am very fond of Indian literature. It was very well written. Although, I didn't like a few things. I didn't like that there were no chapters. There were only 2 sections and I was thrilled when I got to the second part! The book dragged on for me and it took me quite awhile to finish it. It wasn't one that pulled me in.

    • Nalini says:

      A 3.5 really. The first half of the book was a tedious read because it was from a child's perspective and as such was daunting. However, it picked up its pace when the Memsahib started her tale. I related better to her experiences, her emotions because I have always wondered about arranged marriages and the underlying effects, which for me in this book, some light was shed. Not a bad read.

    • Darla says:

      Just couldn't get through it Badami didn't do a good job at explaining terms specific to Hindi, and left the reader to figure out things that were not always easily discernible via context.

    • Lakshmi Mohan says:

      I am obsessed with Indian authors. The book was interesting, maybe not an unputdownable one(I couldn't find any other word that conveys the feeling), but worth giving a shot. It is a cliched plot but that shouldn't stop you from picking it up and reading till the end. There wasn't an element of surprise or novelty, only familiarity. That made it easier to read. Like comfort food, or clothing. Indian women always have an air of mystery around them. I do not know if the perception of Westerners is [...]

    • Diane says:

      i liked it a lot, but i am very partial to indian authors, so i wouldn't recommend it to many people.

    • Carolyn Gerk says:

      I found this book in a used book store and grabbed it having previously read and enjoyed Anita Rau Badmi's Can You Hear the Nightbird Call? Sadly this story didn't not live up to my expectations. Following an Indian mother and daughter and telling each woman's story, Tamarind Mem fell really short. I felt little to no connection with any of the characters and, truthfully, found them all to grow a bit wearing after time. There wasn't one character with whom I felt any connection nor did I feel an [...]

    • Patty says:

      I have to admit that one of the reasons I started reading this book was because it has the word tamarind on its title. I love tamarind, tamarind juice, tamarind candy or that tamarind syrup that they put on top of shaved ice. But besides that, I also wanted to read this book because it talks about India, and I love books about India. Also because it talks about mothers and daughters and that's a topic I care about. I ended up with mixed feelings about this book. While I did learn things about In [...]

    • Divya says:

      I liked what Tamarind Woman had to say. Hers wasn't an exceptional life as most lives tend to be. The first half is narrated by her daughter and the second half by the Tamarind Woman herself. There aren't any facts in this world. Just emotions built on perceptions. The book ends with the tamarind woman, now old, taking a tour on Indian trains, alone. The daughters abroad are worried that their mother may hurt herself or die. They are convinced that she has gone senile. But the Tamarind Woman is [...]

    • Rose Moore says:

      "Tamarind Woman" is the story of two generations of Indian women, a mother and daughter, as they work through their memories and their family history. Filled with wonderful descriptions of growing up in India, Badami paints a careful picture of the differences in how both women saw the man of the house throughout the years. I loved how the twists and turns within the narrative aren't solely in the facts of the story, but also in how each character perceives the others. Illuminating and well-writ [...]

    • Rosemary says:

      I see the South Asian community in Canada and know so little about the people. This is a poetically-written book about Indian women--mother and daughter and women of the household. An insight into an arranged marriage and the limitations on women in other parts of the world. The daughter decides to go to a university as far away from Madras as possible."Calgary!" exclaims the mother. "Canada, Canada and where is that place? In the North Pole, that's where," and Canadians will read this and laugh [...]

    • Doriana Bisegna says:

      I know that Anita Rau Badami is a great writer! This book however didn't grab me and didn't hold my attention! Even though the premise of the story was wonderful (an Indian daughter's story and then her Mother's story) the characters weren't rich enough for my liking. They started to grate on my nerves and that is not a good thing! I must admit I thought of abandoning this book halfway through but trudged on like the faithful bibliophile that I am. I still look forward to reading The Hero's Walk [...]

    • Janaia says:

      I loved this book and read it twice! Very good story telling. Opened my eyes to some of the culture of India. After I read it the first time I went straight to an Indian resturant to immerse myself into the spices of India and searched for more books like it. The book is divided into two parts. The daughter's story and then the Mother's. Loved it, loved it, loved it!

    • Trish Yap says:

      This went straight to my "favorites" shelf! What I liked about this story is how it explored parent-child relationship throughout generations. Reading from Saroja's perspective allowed me to see a mother as an individual being who has her own dreams, feelings and beliefs apart from those for her children. It's an eye opener for the numerous sacrifices that women make for her family. I also loved reading this book because I was able to take a glimpse of the life and culture of Indian women and th [...]

    • Mary Curran says:

      Wow, it took a long time to read this short book which I got signed at the author’s reading in 1997. I really enjoyed it, which was why I kept it on the list of Currently reading when it got respelled and fell out of circulation for a couple of years.

    • Modern Abbess says:

      Tamarind Mem is a story about a daughter, Kamini, who desires to know her perplexing mother, Saroja, and her secret life which Kamini caught glimpses of as a child. The story begins with Kamini’s portrait of her mother painted with recollections from her childhood, interspersed with glimpses from the present as Saroja takes a train ride around India as a sort of pilgrimage, and send vague postcards to Kamini. Kamini’s memories as a child are brilliantly portrayed as the voice alternates betw [...]

    • James Fehr says:

      I cannot explain how much I hated this book. Do not want, 0/10. Everything grated against me and annoyed me, and at the end of it all I felt like this book had detracted from me and made me less of a person. Pandering and slow, spineless and without grace. Not for me at all.

    • P D says:

      This book is structured in two halves, the first half centering around Kamini, the daughter who now resides in Canada and is trying to make sense of her mother's sudden decision to travel around India without any kind of plan in hand (which sounds pretty unsafe to me); the second half is from Saroja, the mother's perspective herself.The title comes from tamarind's sourness (for those of you who like samosas, the red chutney is traditionally made with it; jaggery is added for the sweetness) and S [...]

    • Shivangi says:

      The story starts off interesting and sort of mysterious but then it starts getting boring at some point and this Linda aaya has got to be the most annoying character in the whole story with her know-it-all attitude, but I liked it, nonetheless. I liked Kamini's character, I could relate to her in a few ways. With her mother, Saroja, I had some sort of love-hate relationship; I really despised her behaviour sometimes, especially when she was bitter and cold and at times even bitchy, and that too [...]

    • Melanie says:

      I struggled a bit with this book. I was given the book ten or more years ago and was told that it was amazing. I finally got around to reading it as I'd read another one of Ms. Badami's books (Can You Hear the Nightbird Call?) and loved it. I'm not sure if it was the style of writing that was tripping me up or whether it was the format (I am used to reading trade style paperbacks but had this one in mass-market - ick). At any rate, once I got into Saroja's side of the story, it made Kamini's sid [...]

    • Debra Schoenberger says:

      Reading this novel was similar to sitting in someone's kitchen and listening to someone else's conversation. Kamini recounts her childhood memories, some pleasant, others not so much. It seems that she could not understand why her mother was always so bitter. The story continues on as memories unfold. At one point, I wondered, "where was this all leading?" It was getting a little depressing. There were also gaps in the memories that Kamini was unable to fill in and these left you wondering what [...]

    • Gen Lebovitch says:

      I find this book to really open eyes to what some women go through in marriage. In particular marriages that are not based on love. I also love how it portrays peoples ideas of each other, expectations that no matter how hard they try they just can't get each other to measure up. On the other hand it is about a mother and daughter relationship and what children's views of their parents lives differ from the reality, being to young to truly grasp what goes on between man and woman. they tend to b [...]

    • Theresa says:

      This book was ok. The beginning was very slow and very hard for me to get into. The writing was very peculiar. Sort of like a stream of thought that just goes every which way and you have to figure out where it is going. After a while I got used to it, and used to the use of many Indian words that I did not have any idea what they meant (nor was any reference provided nor did I find it easy to infer by the setting). The story was sub-par. Nothing new. And I felt like we were not very much reward [...]

    • Rachel says:

      (Actual rating = 2.75 stars)Tamarind Woman is the tale of Saroja, a sharp-tongued woman who marries an older, taciturn man who works for the Indian railroad system. The story is told from the perspective of her older daughter Kamini and her own perspective. Rau Badami is a great writer, but I didn't think she told a great story in this book. It's richly detailed, but I feel like the characters don't really develop, and I didn't feel as though I understood their motivation for acting as they did. [...]

    • Robbin says:

      OMG, I didn't think I'd ever finish this. Depicting the life of two women, this story is divided in half. The first half is told by the eldest daughter of Saroja, a woman's whose tongue is so sharp, she's nicknamed the "tamarind" woman. If you've never tasted tamarind, it is extremely sour and strong. The other half of the book is told through the eyes of Saroja who reveals why she has a bitter tongue.Sweet story, but the first half is rather boring. The second half is much better and reads quic [...]

    • Marian says:

      I loved this book, that I read a few years ago. I still get flashes of memories of it, about the railroad and how the more privileged - but not really rich - people in India lived. I think I have read another book about the Indian railroad.I think the railroad must be particularly iconic, and reminiscent of a "golden age" in India - just the info. about trains and the life of "train families" was so interesting. I can't even recall the story very well now - just some strong impressions - but I k [...]

    • Lindsey says:

      This book is told from two different points of view: the eldest daughter and the mother. The daughter tells the story the first half of the book and the mother finishes. The mother is a lot more interesting and has actually done some naughty things--has an affair, mouths off to pretty much everyone, travels alone. For that reason, the second half of the book is a lot more interesting than the first.

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