Nobody's Home: Candid Reflections of a Nursing Home Aide

Nobody s Home Candid Reflections of a Nursing Home Aide At present nursing homes are designed like outmoded zoos Residents are kept in small rooms emotionally isolated Occasionally they are visited by family members who reach through the bars and offer th

  • Title: Nobody's Home: Candid Reflections of a Nursing Home Aide
  • Author: Thomas Edward Gass Bruce C. Vladeck
  • ISBN: 9780801472619
  • Page: 385
  • Format: Paperback
    • Free Read [Humor and Comedy Book] ☆ Nobody's Home: Candid Reflections of a Nursing Home Aide - by Thomas Edward Gass Bruce C. Vladeck Í
      385 Thomas Edward Gass Bruce C. Vladeck
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Humor and Comedy Book] ☆ Nobody's Home: Candid Reflections of a Nursing Home Aide - by Thomas Edward Gass Bruce C. Vladeck Í
      Posted by:Thomas Edward Gass Bruce C. Vladeck
      Published :2020-01-21T22:06:24+00:00

    At present nursing homes are designed like outmoded zoos Residents are kept in small rooms, emotionally isolated Occasionally they are visited by family members who reach through the bars and offer them treats Aides keep their bodies clean and presentable America invests huge amounts of money to maintain the body while leaving the person to languish, cut o At present nursing homes are designed like outmoded zoos Residents are kept in small rooms, emotionally isolated Occasionally they are visited by family members who reach through the bars and offer them treats Aides keep their bodies clean and presentable America invests huge amounts of money to maintain the body while leaving the person to languish, cut off from all they love From Nobody s HomeAfter caring for his mother at the end of her life, Thomas Edward Gass felt drawn to serve the elderly He took a job as a nursing home aide but was not prepared for the reality that he found at his new place of employment, a for profit long term care facility In a book that is by turns chilling and graphic, poignant and funny, Gass describes America s system of warehousing its oldest citizens.Gass brings the reader into the sterile home with its flat metal roof and concrete block walls Like an industrial park complex, it is clean, efficient, and functional He is blunt about the institution s goal keep those faint hearts pumping and the life savings and Medicaid dollars rolling in With 130 beds in the facility, the owner grosses about three million dollars annually As a relatively well paid aide, Gass made 6.90 an hour.Seventeen of the twenty six residents on Gass s hall were incontinent, and much of his initiation to the work was learning to care for them in the most intimate ways One of the many challenges was the limited time that he had available for each of his charges 17.3 minutes per day by his calculation Even as he learned to ignore all but the most pressing demands of the residents, he discovered the remarkable lengths to which aides and their patients will go to relieve the constant ache of loneliness at the nursing home.With Americans living longer than ever before, elder care is among the fastest growing occupations This book makes clear that there is a systemic conflict between profit and extent of care Instead of controlling costs and maximizing profits, what if long term care focused on our basic need to lead meaningful and connected lives until our deaths What if staff members dropped the feigned hope of forestalling the inevitable and concentrated on making their charges comfortable and respected These and other questions raised by this powerful book will cause Americans to rethink how nursing homes are run, staffed, and financed as well as the circumstances under which we hope to meet our end.

    Comment 712

    • andrea says:

      Brilliant! Humanizing. Contains great examples of person-centered care

    • Grape says:

      I'm not sure when Tom was a CNA, but the state of things in our nursing homes concerns me. It's not for lack of trying on the employees' part, they just constantly find themselves in a state of being short-staffed and over worked. I don't think they get paid enough to do what they do, and they really should because they would probably find they have more people available willing to do this work.This book made me laugh out loud at times even though many topics are grim. Especially interesting for [...]

    • Christy says:

      A must-read for anyone who works in the medical field (especially in long-term care) and for anyone who has a family member in a nursing home or long-term care facility

    • Aimee says:

      Tom Gass describes his experience as a certified nursing assistant (CNA) and the struggle to provide the most basic care needs in the best way possible to an assigned group (oftimes overwhelmingly large) of elderly residents. CNAs are the staff members who assist residents with dining, toileting, dressing, etc. They provide the most intimate care (cleaning up urine/bowel incontinence) that would be unthinkable to many. Gass points out that while the companies that own nursing homes are rolling i [...]

    • Kara O says:

      3 1/2 really.It was a hard read. I have been reading and thinking a lot about long-term care since I worked in a facility. Gass describes all parts of the experience, the deep connection with residents, the shit the aides deal with (literally and figuratively), the questions of is this how we are supposed to treat those who are dying?It is very poetic. At times A little slow. He does invite you to contemplate bigger questions in the epilogue, which I appreciate and have been doing for awhile. Wh [...]

    • Brandi (Rambles of a SAHM) says:

      I have to admit that I only read this because an employee of my husband wrote it. I was pleasantly surprised. It should be a must read for all of those in the industry. Tom has great insights into this. He doesn’t presume to have the answers he just provides information. It is hard to think about the realities of nursing home life, especially when it is what is happening within your family and may be in your personal future as well. This is a book that will stick with me for some time to come. [...]

    • Janet says:

      Gass takes a snapshot of what it is like to work as a nursing home aide. He holds nothing back--absolutely nothing. As someone who has worked in lower level healthcare jobs, it's a breath of fresh air to finally read a book about "us".

    • Diana says:

      As a hopeful future nursing home LPN, I enjoyed this book. It gives some info as to the living situation in homes, as well as highlighting the shortage of nursing home providers.

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